Led Zeppelin Studio Albums | Led Zeppelin Site

Coda

Coda

Coda is the ninth and final studio album by the English rock band Led Zeppelin, released in 1982. The album is a collection of outtakes from various sessions during Led Zeppelin’s twelve-year career. It was released two years after the group had officially disbanded following the death of drummer John Bonham.


The word coda, meaning a passage that ends a musical piece following the main body, was therefore chosen as a title.


Led Zeppelin Discography

In Through the Out Door

In Through the Out Door


In Through the Out Door is the eighth studio album by the English rock band Led Zeppelin, and their final album of entirely new material. It was recorded over a three-week period in November and December 1978 at ABBA’s Polar Studios in Stockholm, Sweden, and released by Swan Song Records on 15 August 1979.


In Through the Out Door was the band’s sixth and final studio release to reach the top of the charts in America, and was the last released by the band before the death of drummer John Bonham in 1980.


Led Zeppelin Discography

Presence

Presence


Presence is the seventh studio album by English rock band Led Zeppelin, released by Swan Song Records on 31 March 1976. It was written and recorded during a tumultuous time in the band’s history, as singer Robert Plant was recuperating from serious injuries he had sustained in a recent car accident. The album received mixed reviews from critics and is also the slowest-selling studio album by the band (other than the outtake album Coda), only managing to achieve triple-platinum certification in the United States. Nonetheless, guitarist Jimmy Page describes Presence as the band’s “most important” album, proving they would continue despite their turmoil.


Six of the seven songs on the album are Page and Plant compositions; the remaining song being credited to all four band members. This can be explained by the fact that the majority of the songs were formulated at Malibu, where Page (but not Bonham and Jones) had initially joined a recuperating Plant. With Plant at less than full fitness, Page took responsibility for the album’s completion, and his playing dominates the album’s tracks.


Led Zeppelin Discography

Physical Graffiti

Physical Graffiti


Physical Graffiti is the sixth studio album by the English rock band Led Zeppelin, released on 24 February 1975 as a double album. Recording sessions for the album were initially disrupted when bassist/keyboardist John Paul Jones considered leaving the band. After reuniting at Headley Grange, the band wrote and recorded eight songs, the combined length of which stretched the album beyond the typical length of an LP. This prompted the band to make Physical Graffiti a double album by including previously unreleased tracks from earlier recording sessions.


Physical Graffiti was commercially and critically successful; the album went 16x platinum (though this signifies shipping of eight million copies, as it is a double album) in the US alone.


Led Zeppelin Discography

Houses of the Holy

Houses of the Holy


Houses of the Holy is the fifth studio album by the English rock band Led Zeppelin, released by Atlantic Records on 28 March 1973. The album title is a dedication by the band to their fans who appeared at venues they dubbed “Houses of the Holy”. It was the second Led Zeppelin album not to be officially titled after the band. It was also the first of the band’s albums to be composed of completely original material. It represents a musical turning point for Led Zeppelin, as they began to use more layering and production techniques in recording their songs.

The album contains several of Led Zeppelin’s most famous songs, including “The Song Remains the Same”, “Over the Hills and Far Away”, “Dancing Days” and “D’yer Mak’er”, and the album was later certified eleven times platinum by the RIAA. The title track was also recorded in the sessions for this album, but was left unreleased until its appearance on their next album, Physical Graffiti.


In 2012, Houses of the Holy was ranked number 148 on Rolling Stone magazine’s list of the 500 greatest albums of all time.


Led Zeppelin Discography

Led Zeppelin IV

Led Zeppelin IV

The fourth album by the English rock band Led Zeppelin was released on 8 November 1971. No title is printed on the album, so it is usually referred to as Led Zeppelin IV, following the naming standard used by the band’s first three studio albums. The album has alternatively been referred to as ZOSO, Four Symbols, The Fourth Album (those two titles each having been used in the Atlantic catalogue), Untitled, Runes, The Hermit, and ZoSo, the latter of which is derived from the symbol used by Jimmy Page for the album sleeve. Page often had the ZoSo symbol embroidered on his clothes.


Upon its release, Led Zeppelin IV was a commercial and critical success. The album is one of the best-selling albums worldwide at 32 million units. It is also certified twenty-three times platinum by the RIAA, making it the third-best-selling album ever in the US. In 2003, the album was ranked 69th on Rolling Stone magazine’s list of “The 500 Greatest Albums of All Time”.


Led Zeppelin Discography

Led Zeppelin III

Led Zeppelin III

Led Zeppelin III is the third studio album by the English rock band Led Zeppelin. It was recorded between January and July 1970 and released on 5 October 1970 by Atlantic Records. Composed largely at a remote cottage in Wales known as Bron-Yr-Aur, this work represented a maturing of the band’s music towards a greater emphasis on folk and acoustic sounds. This surprised many fans and critics, and upon its release the album received rather indifferent reviews.


Although it is not one of the highest sellers in Zeppelin’s catalogue, Led Zeppelin III is now generally praised, and acknowledged as representing an important milestone in the band’s history. Although acoustic songs are featured on Led Zeppelin III’s predecessors, it is this album which is widely acknowledged for showing that Led Zeppelin was more than just a conventional rock band and that they could branch out into wider musical territory.


Led Zeppelin Discography

Led Zeppelin II

Led Zeppelin II

Led Zeppelin II is the second studio album by the English rock band Led Zeppelin, released in October 1969 on Atlantic Records. Recording sessions for the album took place at several locations in the United Kingdom and North America from January to August 1969. Production was entirely credited to lead guitarist and songwriter Jimmy Page, while it also served as Led Zeppelin’s first album to utilise the recording techniques of engineer Eddie Kramer.

Led Zeppelin II furthered the lyrical themes established on their debut album, creating a work that became more widely acclaimed and influential than its predecessor. With elements of blues and folk music, it also exhibits the band’s evolving musical style of blues-derived material and their guitar and riff-based sound. It is considered the band’s heaviest album.


Upon release, Led Zeppelin II sold well and was Led Zeppelin’s first album to reach number one in the UK and the US. In 1970, art director David Juniper was nominated for a Grammy Award for Best Recording Package for the album. On 15 November 1999, it was certified 12× Platinum by the RIAA for sales in excess of 12 million copies. Since its release, writers and music critics have regularly cited it in polls of the greatest and most influential rock albums.


Led Zeppelin Discography

Led Zeppelin I

Led Zeppelin I

Led Zeppelin is the debut album by the English rock band Led Zeppelin. It was recorded in October 1968 at Olympic Studios in London and released on Atlantic Records on 12 January 1969 in the United States and 31 March 1969 in the United Kingdom. The album featured integral contributions from each of the group’s four musicians and established Led Zeppelin’s fusion of blues and rock. Led Zeppelin also created a large and devoted following for the band, with their take on the emerging heavy metal sound endearing them to a section of the counterculture on both sides of the Atlantic.

Although the album initially received negative reviews, it was commercially very successful and has now come to be regarded in a much more positive light by critics. In 2003, the album was ranked number 29 on Rolling Stone magazine’s list of the 500 greatest albums of all time. When Rolling Stone updated the list in 2012 the album remained ranked at 29th greatest of all time. In 2004 the album was inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame.

Led Zeppelin Discography